Afghanistan Analysts Network – English

Posts tagged: US

US

AAN In The Media – October 2012

AAN Team

Kremlin’s Blunder Backfires in Central Asia Turkish Weekly, 31 October 2012 Author Ryskeldi Satke looks at latest developments in Russia’s Central Asia policy after Putin’s re-election. Amon others, he quotes a blog by AAN’s Thomas Ruttig underscoring comments made by the Tajik opposition figures according to whom the threat of the Taliban marching over the […]

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In southern Afghanistan, concerns about what comes next

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Washington Post, 30 September 2012 A reportage from Garmser, Helmand, where again ‘tribal leaders are the backbone of this strategically vital region near. If they refuse to support the government after NATO forces leave, U.S. officials say there’s a good chance the Taliban could make a vigorous return. But if traditional leaders present a united […]

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In U.S. soldier’s death, a window into Afghan insider killings

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Reuters, 26 September 2012 The story of Mabry Anders, from Oregon, killed by Welayat Khan, from Nangrahar, in a so-called green-on-blue shooting, who was subsequently killed by a US helicopter himself while fleeing and cannot tell what his motives were anymore. So what remains are three people dead (including another US soldier) and different versions: […]

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The Haqqani Network Blacklisted: From US Asset to Special Foe

Thomas Ruttig

Earlier this month, the US government blacklisted the Haqqani network, labelling it a ‘foreign terrorist organisation’. Leaving aside the pros and cons of this decision, which have been fairly widely discussed, AAN co-director Thomas Ruttig looks at other questions: why did the blacklisting happen so late and why is the network singled out from the […]

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Bagram and Insider Attacks: ‘Shoulder to Shoulder’ no longer?

Kate Clark

It has been a rough week for US-led international forces, with threats, tensions and setbacks multiplying. The Taleban’s spectacular attack on Camp Bastion on 15 September, which left two soldiers – including a lieutenant colonel – dead, six fighter planes destroyed and two others damaged and ISAF’s narrative of a weakening insurgency looking fragile, was […]

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The US Army And Afghanistan’s Bad Divorce

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The Daily Beast
 (blog), 19 September 2012 The experience of a former US trainer embedded in the Afghan security forces, saying that already ‘by the mid 2000s, the relationship [between the trainers and the Afghan troops] had begun to fray’ – because ‘the ANA was growing, getting better at its job, and chaffing at the […]

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Under Strange Flags: Afghans’ delayed protests against an ‘anti-Islam film’

Borhan Osman

Afghanistan’s public has reacted, after a few days of delay, to a video produced by fringe anti-Islam activists in the US. While last Friday saw violent demonstrations in many parts of the Muslim world, Afghans widely remained quite calm despite mullahs across major cities preaching angry sermons about the hostility of America or the West, […]

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The ‘Other Guantanamo’ (3): Bagram and the Struggle for Sovereignty

Kate Clark

Bagram Detention Centre has been officially transferred to Afghan control today, with the fundamental question of sovereignty – who has the right to arrest and detain Afghans on Afghan soil – still not resolved. The US insists it still has the right; the government says this is illegal. On Saturday (8 September 2012), President Karzai, […]

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AAN In The Media – September 2012

AAN Team

The Tricky Business Of Reintegrating The Taliban  NPR, 28 September 2012 In an attempt to put down the insurgency in Afghanistan, the international community has spent millions to try to reintegrate former Taliban fighters and other militants back into society. So how well has it worked? Critics like Kate Clark of the Afghanistan Analysts Network […]

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What Surge? Afghanistan’s Most Violent Places Stay Bad, Despite Extra Troops

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Wired (blog), 23 August 2012 ‘When President Obama surged 30,000 additional U.S. troops into Afghanistan in 2010, the new forces were concentrated overwhelmingly on two volatile areas of southern Afghanistan: Helmand and Kandahar Provinces. Now, as the troop surge is practically over, those provinces still rank as the most violent in the entire country. According […]

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The Takhar attack and Targeted Killings: the Legal Challenge

Kate Clark

An Afghan bank worker from rural Takhar, Habib Rahman, is taking the British government to court over Britain’s participation in drawing up and executing the US military’s ‘kill list’ which singles out alleged insurgents for targeted killing. Rahman lost his father-in-law, Zabet Amanullah, and several other close relatives in September 2010 when an air strike […]

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Why Afghanistan Can’t Wait

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Huffington Post blog, 10 August 2012 The story of two Afghan civil society activists and their failed interview for a US visa – a story that can happen not only at the US embassy in Kabul.

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