Afghanistan Analysts Network – English

International Engagement

The Guesthouse Attack and the Run-Off

Thomas Ruttig 17 min

This time it looks as if the Taleban really have managed to give the Afghan election – more precisely: its second round set for 7 November – its own turn. They already considerably influenced the first round of 20 August when they threatened attacks like cutting of inked fingers of voters but largely left polling sites – and with this uninvolved civilians – UN and election offices alone.

For the first time, they directly targeted and entered a UN accommodation site and killed people on Wednesday. (Of course there were numerous rocket attacks against UN offices or hand grenades hurled over compound walls. Usually no one was harmed. NGO offices also have been attacked in some cases.)

Before dawn, between 5 and 6 am men with guns and suicide vests stormed Bakhtar Guesthouse, a UN-approved accommodation, off Kucha-ye Qasaban, or Butcher Street, between Kabul’s Shahr-e Nau and Sherpur areas. Apparently, they wore police uniforms. They killed two Afghan guards first and then five international UN colleagues (revised from the earlier given figure of six). An Afghan civilian, the brother-in-law of Jalalabad (and former Kandahar governor) Gul Agha Sherzai who lived in the neighbourhood, also lost his life, possibly during the following fire-fight with the police.
According to a New York Times report, three UN security guards – one of them American – held the attackers back for an hour while others were able to escape. Does this mean that the police took an hour to get there?

Many more UN staff were rescued. According to the UN, 25 UN employees were living in the guesthouse, 17 of them belonging to UNDP ELECT, a set-up giving technical assistance to the still running presidential election. At least one UNICEF worker is ‘unaccounted for’. A statement of his organisation speaks of ‘grave concern’. According to some media reports, two attackers might have escaped. Have they taken a hostage? Hopefully, the explanation is easier and he or she has spent the night somewhere else…

The nationality of only one of the killed has been clarified yet: The US Embassy in Kabul confirmed that it was an American. A German blogmentions a Lebanese. From Kabul it was indicated that Filipinos might be among the dead as well. Amongst the dead are also women. Some reports spoke of escaping women that got caught in the fire-fight. At least nine other persons were wounded.

The modus operandi of the attack points at the likelihood that – like similar ‘commando-style’ attacks aimed at grabbing media attention as the one targeting Kabul Serena hotel in January 2008 or administrative centres in Gardez and Khost in May and July this year – the Haqqani network could be behind it. Although it is a semi-autonomous entity of the broader Taleban movement and determines its own operations without prior consent by the Taleban leadership under Mulla Omar, a known Taleban spokesman, Zabihullah Mujahed, took responsibility for it, i.e. in the name of the whole Taleban movement. This is a clear sign that the whole Taleban leadership stand behind the rejection of the elections.

It should, however, not be taken as the final sign that the strongest insurgence group is irreconcilable. That would be a conclusion under rage. Talks with armed opponents while they still carry on their fight has occurred in many countries.

On 24 October, the Taleban had announced such attacks. According to theBBC, they declared in their common official tone that the ‘Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan once again urges their respected countrymen not to participate’ in the elections and that their fighters would ‘launch operations against the enemy and stop people from taking part’ in the poll.

That still sounded similar to what happened around 20 August. Then, their threats which were underscored by instructions to bazaar traders in some towns to close down their shops were sufficient to urge many people to stay home for a few days over E-Day. But the threats were only one part of the story. There was no major attack in the South or Southeast where they were expected. The largest fighting took place in the north of Baghlan province. The lack of genuine political alternatives (all four frontrunners were members of Karzai’s cabinets earlier), doubts that their votes really would count and would be counted, as well as disenchantment with the whole process (sorry, Martine, the word again – I pay 5 euro for a humanitarian project) were the others. After all, there was very low turnout in relatively safe areas also, like in Kabul.

On 25 October, the Taleban came up with another statement in which they tried to present themselves as the better democrats and even as defenders of media freedom. In the statement ‘Regarding the Runoff Elections’, they mocked the elections as a ‘parody’, a ‘wicked manoeuvre’, ‘no more than an eyewash’ and a ‘new episode [of a] soap opera’. They criticised ‘flagrant fraud’ and said that it had forecast earlier that ‘the decision [about who wins] was taken in Washington’. They appealed to the ‘impartial and independent media’ not to cover up new fraud. They also did not forget to mention that ‘foreign nationals’ in the ECC had rendered the IEC ‘powerless and incapable’ during round one. They renewed their call for a ‘complete boycott […] on the basis of the rules of the sharia’ and stated that they ‘closely monitor all workers, officials and voters’. Finally, they urged the movement’s mujahedin to ‘carry out operations against their [polling] centers; prevent people from participating in the elections and block all roads and paths for all public and government vehicles one day before the day of the polling and inform people about this’. The attack should involve ‘new experiences […] in addition to the previous tactics’.

After Wednesday’s attack they added that they considered anyone ‘engaged’ with the elections a legitimate target and that this was just ‘the first step’.

At the same time, they carefully avoid to directly threaten Afghan civilians not linked to the government. This is an analogy to the new ‘Layha for the Mujahedin’ (De Mujahedino lepara Layha) – a 13-chapter and 67-point code of conduct issued in May this year in form of a booklet by the ‘Secretariat (dar-ul-insha) of the Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan’, signed by the ‘Amir-ul-Mo’menin’ (Mulla Muhammad Omar) and supposed to be distributed amongst all Taleban fighters – that states in rule number 41/3 that they should ‘try their best to avoid killing local people’. Amongst other things, privatising war bounty (rules 22-26), filming executions (rule 18), cutting off ‘people’s ears, noses and lips (rule 51), ‘forced ushr, zakat and chanda’ tax collection (rule 52), kidnapping for money (rule 54) and recruiting under-age (‘beardless’) youngsters (rule 50) are prohibited. In case of noncompliance, the ‘mujahed’ will be ‘expelled’ from the movement’s ranks (rule 47).

Although the layha can be seen as a part of a Taleban campaign to present itself as an organised force and parallel ‘government in waiting’ and to address some aspects of international humanitarian law, it leaves a lot to be desired. Only to pick two aspects: Suicide attacks are still considered to be a legitimate means of war, although the bombers should be ‘educated’ volunteers and only should target ‘high and important targets (rule 41/1-4). And in contrast to an earlier version from 2006, there are no specific regulations how to treat civilian foreigners.

In its rule 26, it stated: ‚Those NGOs that came into the country under the government of the non-believers, must be equally treated with this government. They came under the pretext to help the people but in reality they are part of the regime. This is why we do not tolerate any of their activities.‘

The new layha does not contain this rule anymore and, at best, leaves it open whether the UN (and NGOs) now can be treated as enemies.

(The translation is my own. This version of the layha in a German translation was published in the Swiss ‘Weltwoche‘, no. 46/2006, dated 15 Nov 2006 under this link which, however, does not seem to work anymore. For the records, find the German version of the translated 2005 layha as published in ‘Weltwoche’ below. The author would be very grateful for an English, Dari or Pashto version of it.)

The UN, meanwhile, announced that it will ‘look at whether other appropriate measures need to be taken to protect all our staff’ and tried to show defiance. A UN staff member from Kabul, who was quoted on the German blog mentioned above, fears that the UN now ‘will fall into a security frenzy that will make it very difficult to hold the election.’

Condemning the murder of their employees and Afghan citizens, UNAMA head Kai Eide said in a statement from Kabul: ‘This attack will not deter the UN from continuing all its work to reconstruct a war torn country and to build a better future for all Afghans. We will remain committed to the people of Afghanistan.’ Surprisingly enough, neither his nor Secretary-Genral Ban Ki Moon’s statements contain any word on the upcoming run-off election.

This seems to be consistent with reports from Kabul saying that UN personnel has been told that they would not have any role in monitoring the second round of elections. Apart from what that says about the UN leadership – the Taleban have done a favour to President Karzai who now seems to have embraced the run-off and is confident to win.

Taliban
Layeha (Regelbuch) für die Mudschaheddin
Von Urs Gehriger
Weltwoche, Ausgabe 46/06, November 16, 2006.
http://www.weltwoche.ch/artikel/default.asp?AssetID=15351&CategoryID=91

Vom Obersten Führer des Islamischen Emirates Afghanistan: Die Regeln für die Mudschaheddin.
Jeder Mudschahed ist verpflichtet, die folgenden Regeln einzuhalten:

1) Einem Taliban-Kommandanten ist es gestattet, eine Einladung an diejenigen Afghanen auszusprechen, die Ungläubige unterstützen, damit sie zum wahren Islam übertreten.

2) Wer den Ungläubigen den Rücken kehrt, dem garantieren wir Sicherheit für Leib und Besitz. Wenn er sich jedoch in einen Disput verwickelt oder jemand etwas gegen ihn vorbringt, muss er sich unserem Rechtswesen stellen.

3) Mudschaheddin, die Überläufern Sicherheit gewähren, müssen ihren Kommandanten informieren.

4) Wer zu den Taliban übertritt, aber sich nicht loyal verhält und zum Verräter wird, verliert unseren Schutz. Ihm wird keine zweite Chance gegeben.

5) Ein Mudschahed, der einen Überläufer tötet, verliert unseren Schutz und muss nach islamischem Recht bestraft werden.

6) Wenn ein Taliban-Kämpfer in einen anderen Distrikt übersiedeln will, ist er dazu befugt, muss aber zuerst von seinem Gruppenführer die Erlaubnis einholen.

7) Ein Mudschahed, der einen ausländischen Ungläubigen ohne Einwilligung eines Gruppenführers gefangen nimmt, darf ihn nicht gegen einen anderen Gefangenen oder gegen Geld austauschen.

8) Ein Provinz-, Distrikts- oder Regionalkommandant darf nicht einen Arbeitsvertrag mit einer Nichtregierungsorganisation (NGO) abschliessen oder von einer NGO Geld entgegennehmen. Einzig die Schura (der höchste Taliban-Rat) darf über Verhandlungen mit NGOs bestimmen.

9) Taliban dürfen Dschihad-Ausrüstung und -Eigentum nicht für persönliche Zwecke verwenden.

10) Jeder Talib ist seinen Vorgesetzten Rechenschaft schuldig über die Geldausgaben und den Gebrauch von Ausrüstung.

11) Mudschaheddin dürfen keine Ausrüstung verkaufen, ausser der Provinzkommandant gibt die Erlaubnis dazu.

12) Eine Gruppe von Mudschaheddin darf nicht Mudschaheddin aus einer anderen Gruppe aufnehmen, um ihre eigene Macht zu vergrössern. Dies ist nur gestattet, wenn gute Gründe vorliegen, wie ein Mangel an eigenen Kämpfern. Dann muss eine schriftliche Erlaubnis eingeholt werden, und die Waffen der Übertretenden müssen bei der alten Gruppe verbleiben.

13) Waffen und Ausrüstung, die Ungläubigen oder ihren Alliierten abgenommen wurden, müssen gerecht unter den Mudschaheddin verteilt werden.

14) Wenn jemand, der mit den Ungläubigen zusammenarbeitet, mit den Mudschaheddin kooperieren will, darf ihn niemand töten. Wenn ihn trotzdem jemand tötet, muss der Mörder vor ein islamisches Gericht gestellt werden.

15) Ein Mudschahed oder Führer, der einen unschuldigen Menschen belästigt, muss durch seinen Vorgesetzten verwarnt werden. Wenn er sein Verhalten trotzdem nicht ändert, muss er von der Taliban-Bewegung ausgestossen werden.

16) Es ist strikte verboten, ohne Erlaubnis eines Distrikts- oder Provinzkommandanten Häuser von Zivilisten zu durchsuchen und Waffen zu konfiszieren.

17) Mudschaheddin haben kein Recht, Geld oder persönlichen Besitz von Zivilisten zu konfiszieren.

18) Mudschaheddin sollten das Rauchen von Zigaretten unterlassen.

19) Mudschaheddin ist es nicht erlaubt, Jünglinge ohne Bartwuchs auf das Schlachtfeld oder in ihre Privatgemächer mitzunehmen.

20) Wenn Mitglieder der Opposition oder der zivilen Regierung sich den Taliban ergeben möchten, können wir ihre Bedingungen in Betracht ziehen. Der Entscheid darüber muss vom Militärrat getroffen werden.

21) Wer einen schlechten Ruf geniesst oder während des Dschihad Zivilisten getötet hat, darf nicht in die Taliban-Bewegung aufgenommen werden. Wenn ihm der Oberste Führer persönlich verziehen hat, sollte er künftig zu Hause bleiben.

22) Wenn ein Mudschahed eines Verbrechens schuldig befunden worden ist und sein Kommandant ihn aus der Gruppe ausgeschlossen hat, darf keine andere Gruppe ihn aufnehmen. Falls er wieder Anschluss an die Taliban haben möchte, muss er sich an seine alte Gruppe wenden und um Vergebung bitten.

23) Wenn ein Mudschahed mit einem Problem konfrontiert ist, das nicht in diesem Buch erörtert wird, muss der zuständige Kommandant in Konsultation mit der Gruppe eine Lösung finden.

24) Als Lehrer unter der gegenwärtigen Marionettenregierung zu arbeiten, ist verboten, denn dies stärkt das System der Ungläubigen. Wahrhafte Muslime sollten sich an einen religiös ausgebildeten Lehrer wenden und in einer Moschee oder in einer ähnlichen Institution studieren. Die Lehrbücher sollten aus der Zeit des Dschihad oder des Taliban-Regimes stammen.

25) Wer als Lehrer unter der gegenwärtigen Marionettenregierung arbeitet, muss verwarnt werden. Wenn er seine Arbeit dennoch nicht aufgibt, muss er geschlagen werden. Falls der Lehrer jedoch wider die Prinzipien des Islams lehrt, muss er vom Distrikts-Kommandanten oder einem Gruppenführer getötet werden.

26) Diejenigen Nichtregierungsorganisationen (NGOs), die unter der Regierung der Ungläubigen ins Land gekommen sind, müssen gleich wie die Regierung behandelt werden. Sie kamen unter dem Vorwand, den Menschen zu helfen, sind aber in Wahrheit Teil des Regimes. Deshalb tolerieren wir keine ihre Aktivitäten, sei es der Bau von Strassen, Brücken, Kliniken, Schulen, Madrassen (Koranschulen) oder anderem. Wenn eine Schule trotz Warnung nicht schliesst, gehört sie verbrannt. Doch zuvor müssen alle religiösen Bücher in Sicherheit gebracht werden.

27) Solange jemand nicht als Spion überführt ist und bestraft werden kann, darf sich nie¬mand in die Angelegenheit einmischen. Die zuständige Person ist der Distrikts¬kommandant. Zeugen, die im Verfahren aussagen, müssen bei guter geistiger Gesundheit sein und über einen tadellosen religiösen Leumund verfügen und dürfen kein grosses Verbrechen begangen haben. Die Bestrafung darf erst nach Abschluss des Verfahrens erfolgen.

28) Kein einfacher Kommandant darf sich in Streitigkeiten der Bevölkerung einmischen. Sofern der Streit nicht gelöst werden kann, muss sich der Distrikts- oder Regional¬kommandant um die Sache kümmern. Der Fall sollte von religiösen Experten (Ulema) oder der Versammlung der Stammesältesten (Jirga) erörtert werden. Falls sie keine Lösung finden, muss der Fall an bekannte religiöse Experten weitergeleitet werden.

29) Jeder Mudschahed ist verpflichtet, Tag und Nacht Wachen zu postieren.

30) Die obigen 29 Regeln sind obligatorisch. Wer immer gegen sie verstösst, muss entsprechend den Gesetzen des Islamischen Emirates gerichtet werden.

Diese Layeha richtet sich an die Mudschaheddin, die ihr Leben für den Islam und den allmächtigen Allah opfern. Dies ist ein komplettes Regelbuch für den Fortschritt des Dschihad, und jeder Mudschahed muss die Regeln einhalten, dies ist die Pflicht eines jeden Dschihadisten und treuen Gläubigen.

Gezeichnet vom Obersten Führer des Islamischen Emirats Afghanistan

(Diese Layeha wurde erstmals an die 33 Mitglieder der Schura, des obersten Rats der Taliban, anlässlich ihres Treffens während des Ramadans 2006 verteilt, Anm. der Red.)

This time it looks as if the Taleban really have managed to give the Afghan election – more precisely: its second round set for 7 November – its own turn. They already considerably influenced the first round of 20 August when they threatened attacks like cutting of inked fingers of voters but largely left polling sites – and with this uninvolved civilians – UN and election offices alone.

For the first time, they directly targeted and entered a UN accommodation site and killed people on Wednesday. (Of course there were numerous rocket attacks against UN offices or hand grenades hurled over compound walls. Usually no one was harmed. NGO offices also have been attacked in some cases.)

Before dawn, between 5 and 6 am men with guns and suicide vests stormed Bakhtar Guesthouse, a UN-approved accommodation, off Kucha-ye Qasaban, or Butcher Street, between Kabul’s Shahr-e Nau and Sherpur areas. Apparently, they wore police uniforms. They killed two Afghan guards first and then five international UN colleagues (revised from the earlier given figure of six). An Afghan civilian, the brother-in-law of Jalalabad (and former Kandahar governor) Gul Agha Sherzai who lived in the neighbourhood, also lost his life, possibly during the following fire-fight with the police.
According to a New York Times report, three UN security guards – one of them American – held the attackers back for an hour while others were able to escape. Does this mean that the police took an hour to get there?

Many more UN staff were rescued. According to the UN, 25 UN employees were living in the guesthouse, 17 of them belonging to UNDP ELECT, a set-up giving technical assistance to the still running presidential election. At least one UNICEF worker is ‘unaccounted for’. A statement of his organisation speaks of ‘grave concern’. According to some media reports, two attackers might have escaped. Have they taken a hostage? Hopefully, the explanation is easier and he or she has spent the night somewhere else…

The nationality of only one of the killed has been clarified yet: The US Embassy in Kabul confirmed that it was an American. A German blogmentions a Lebanese. From Kabul it was indicated that Filipinos might be among the dead as well. Amongst the dead are also women. Some reports spoke of escaping women that got caught in the fire-fight. At least nine other persons were wounded.

The modus operandi of the attack points at the likelihood that – like similar ‘commando-style’ attacks aimed at grabbing media attention as the one targeting Kabul Serena hotel in January 2008 or administrative centres in Gardez and Khost in May and July this year – the Haqqani network could be behind it. Although it is a semi-autonomous entity of the broader Taleban movement and determines its own operations without prior consent by the Taleban leadership under Mulla Omar, a known Taleban spokesman, Zabihullah Mujahed, took responsibility for it, i.e. in the name of the whole Taleban movement. This is a clear sign that the whole Taleban leadership stand behind the rejection of the elections.

It should, however, not be taken as the final sign that the strongest insurgence group is irreconcilable. That would be a conclusion under rage. Talks with armed opponents while they still carry on their fight has occurred in many countries.

On 24 October, the Taleban had announced such attacks. According to theBBC, they declared in their common official tone that the ‘Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan once again urges their respected countrymen not to participate’ in the elections and that their fighters would ‘launch operations against the enemy and stop people from taking part’ in the poll.

That still sounded similar to what happened around 20 August. Then, their threats which were underscored by instructions to bazaar traders in some towns to close down their shops were sufficient to urge many people to stay home for a few days over E-Day. But the threats were only one part of the story. There was no major attack in the South or Southeast where they were expected. The largest fighting took place in the north of Baghlan province. The lack of genuine political alternatives (all four frontrunners were members of Karzai’s cabinets earlier), doubts that their votes really would count and would be counted, as well as disenchantment with the whole process (sorry, Martine, the word again – I pay 5 euro for a humanitarian project) were the others. After all, there was very low turnout in relatively safe areas also, like in Kabul.

On 25 October, the Taleban came up with another statement in which they tried to present themselves as the better democrats and even as defenders of media freedom. In the statement ‘Regarding the Runoff Elections’, they mocked the elections as a ‘parody’, a ‘wicked manoeuvre’, ‘no more than an eyewash’ and a ‘new episode [of a] soap opera’. They criticised ‘flagrant fraud’ and said that it had forecast earlier that ‘the decision [about who wins] was taken in Washington’. They appealed to the ‘impartial and independent media’ not to cover up new fraud. They also did not forget to mention that ‘foreign nationals’ in the ECC had rendered the IEC ‘powerless and incapable’ during round one. They renewed their call for a ‘complete boycott […] on the basis of the rules of the sharia’ and stated that they ‘closely monitor all workers, officials and voters’. Finally, they urged the movement’s mujahedin to ‘carry out operations against their [polling] centers; prevent people from participating in the elections and block all roads and paths for all public and government vehicles one day before the day of the polling and inform people about this’. The attack should involve ‘new experiences […] in addition to the previous tactics’.

After Wednesday’s attack they added that they considered anyone ‘engaged’ with the elections a legitimate target and that this was just ‘the first step’.

At the same time, they carefully avoid to directly threaten Afghan civilians not linked to the government. This is an analogy to the new ‘Layha for the Mujahedin’ (De Mujahedino lepara Layha) – a 13-chapter and 67-point code of conduct issued in May this year in form of a booklet by the ‘Secretariat (dar-ul-insha) of the Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan’, signed by the ‘Amir-ul-Mo’menin’ (Mulla Muhammad Omar) and supposed to be distributed amongst all Taleban fighters – that states in rule number 41/3 that they should ‘try their best to avoid killing local people’. Amongst other things, privatising war bounty (rules 22-26), filming executions (rule 18), cutting off ‘people’s ears, noses and lips (rule 51), ‘forced ushr, zakat and chanda’ tax collection (rule 52), kidnapping for money (rule 54) and recruiting under-age (‘beardless’) youngsters (rule 50) are prohibited. In case of noncompliance, the ‘mujahed’ will be ‘expelled’ from the movement’s ranks (rule 47).

Although the layha can be seen as a part of a Taleban campaign to present itself as an organised force and parallel ‘government in waiting’ and to address some aspects of international humanitarian law, it leaves a lot to be desired. Only to pick two aspects: Suicide attacks are still considered to be a legitimate means of war, although the bombers should be ‘educated’ volunteers and only should target ‘high and important targets (rule 41/1-4). And in contrast to an earlier version from 2006, there are no specific regulations how to treat civilian foreigners.

In its rule 26, it stated: ‚Those NGOs that came into the country under the government of the non-believers, must be equally treated with this government. They came under the pretext to help the people but in reality they are part of the regime. This is why we do not tolerate any of their activities.‘

The new layha does not contain this rule anymore and, at best, leaves it open whether the UN (and NGOs) now can be treated as enemies.

(The translation is my own. This version of the layha in a German translation was published in the Swiss ‘Weltwoche‘, no. 46/2006, dated 15 Nov 2006 under this link which, however, does not seem to work anymore. For the records, find the German version of the translated 2005 layha as published in ‘Weltwoche’ below. The author would be very grateful for an English, Dari or Pashto version of it.)

The UN, meanwhile, announced that it will ‘look at whether other appropriate measures need to be taken to protect all our staff’ and tried to show defiance. A UN staff member from Kabul, who was quoted on the German blog mentioned above, fears that the UN now ‘will fall into a security frenzy that will make it very difficult to hold the election.’

Condemning the murder of their employees and Afghan citizens, UNAMA head Kai Eide said in a statement from Kabul: ‘This attack will not deter the UN from continuing all its work to reconstruct a war torn country and to build a better future for all Afghans. We will remain committed to the people of Afghanistan.’ Surprisingly enough, neither his nor Secretary-Genral Ban Ki Moon’s statements contain any word on the upcoming run-off election.

This seems to be consistent with reports from Kabul saying that UN personnel has been told that they would not have any role in monitoring the second round of elections. Apart from what that says about the UN leadership – the Taleban have done a favour to President Karzai who now seems to have embraced the run-off and is confident to win.

Taliban
Layeha (Regelbuch) für die Mudschaheddin
Von Urs Gehriger
Weltwoche, Ausgabe 46/06, November 16, 2006.
http://www.weltwoche.ch/artikel/default.asp?AssetID=15351&CategoryID=91

Vom Obersten Führer des Islamischen Emirates Afghanistan: Die Regeln für die Mudschaheddin.
Jeder Mudschahed ist verpflichtet, die folgenden Regeln einzuhalten:

1) Einem Taliban-Kommandanten ist es gestattet, eine Einladung an diejenigen Afghanen auszusprechen, die Ungläubige unterstützen, damit sie zum wahren Islam übertreten.

2) Wer den Ungläubigen den Rücken kehrt, dem garantieren wir Sicherheit für Leib und Besitz. Wenn er sich jedoch in einen Disput verwickelt oder jemand etwas gegen ihn vorbringt, muss er sich unserem Rechtswesen stellen.

3) Mudschaheddin, die Überläufern Sicherheit gewähren, müssen ihren Kommandanten informieren.

4) Wer zu den Taliban übertritt, aber sich nicht loyal verhält und zum Verräter wird, verliert unseren Schutz. Ihm wird keine zweite Chance gegeben.

5) Ein Mudschahed, der einen Überläufer tötet, verliert unseren Schutz und muss nach islamischem Recht bestraft werden.

6) Wenn ein Taliban-Kämpfer in einen anderen Distrikt übersiedeln will, ist er dazu befugt, muss aber zuerst von seinem Gruppenführer die Erlaubnis einholen.

7) Ein Mudschahed, der einen ausländischen Ungläubigen ohne Einwilligung eines Gruppenführers gefangen nimmt, darf ihn nicht gegen einen anderen Gefangenen oder gegen Geld austauschen.

8) Ein Provinz-, Distrikts- oder Regionalkommandant darf nicht einen Arbeitsvertrag mit einer Nichtregierungsorganisation (NGO) abschliessen oder von einer NGO Geld entgegennehmen. Einzig die Schura (der höchste Taliban-Rat) darf über Verhandlungen mit NGOs bestimmen.

9) Taliban dürfen Dschihad-Ausrüstung und -Eigentum nicht für persönliche Zwecke verwenden.

10) Jeder Talib ist seinen Vorgesetzten Rechenschaft schuldig über die Geldausgaben und den Gebrauch von Ausrüstung.

11) Mudschaheddin dürfen keine Ausrüstung verkaufen, ausser der Provinzkommandant gibt die Erlaubnis dazu.

12) Eine Gruppe von Mudschaheddin darf nicht Mudschaheddin aus einer anderen Gruppe aufnehmen, um ihre eigene Macht zu vergrössern. Dies ist nur gestattet, wenn gute Gründe vorliegen, wie ein Mangel an eigenen Kämpfern. Dann muss eine schriftliche Erlaubnis eingeholt werden, und die Waffen der Übertretenden müssen bei der alten Gruppe verbleiben.

13) Waffen und Ausrüstung, die Ungläubigen oder ihren Alliierten abgenommen wurden, müssen gerecht unter den Mudschaheddin verteilt werden.

14) Wenn jemand, der mit den Ungläubigen zusammenarbeitet, mit den Mudschaheddin kooperieren will, darf ihn niemand töten. Wenn ihn trotzdem jemand tötet, muss der Mörder vor ein islamisches Gericht gestellt werden.

15) Ein Mudschahed oder Führer, der einen unschuldigen Menschen belästigt, muss durch seinen Vorgesetzten verwarnt werden. Wenn er sein Verhalten trotzdem nicht ändert, muss er von der Taliban-Bewegung ausgestossen werden.

16) Es ist strikte verboten, ohne Erlaubnis eines Distrikts- oder Provinzkommandanten Häuser von Zivilisten zu durchsuchen und Waffen zu konfiszieren.

17) Mudschaheddin haben kein Recht, Geld oder persönlichen Besitz von Zivilisten zu konfiszieren.

18) Mudschaheddin sollten das Rauchen von Zigaretten unterlassen.

19) Mudschaheddin ist es nicht erlaubt, Jünglinge ohne Bartwuchs auf das Schlachtfeld oder in ihre Privatgemächer mitzunehmen.

20) Wenn Mitglieder der Opposition oder der zivilen Regierung sich den Taliban ergeben möchten, können wir ihre Bedingungen in Betracht ziehen. Der Entscheid darüber muss vom Militärrat getroffen werden.

21) Wer einen schlechten Ruf geniesst oder während des Dschihad Zivilisten getötet hat, darf nicht in die Taliban-Bewegung aufgenommen werden. Wenn ihm der Oberste Führer persönlich verziehen hat, sollte er künftig zu Hause bleiben.

22) Wenn ein Mudschahed eines Verbrechens schuldig befunden worden ist und sein Kommandant ihn aus der Gruppe ausgeschlossen hat, darf keine andere Gruppe ihn aufnehmen. Falls er wieder Anschluss an die Taliban haben möchte, muss er sich an seine alte Gruppe wenden und um Vergebung bitten.

23) Wenn ein Mudschahed mit einem Problem konfrontiert ist, das nicht in diesem Buch erörtert wird, muss der zuständige Kommandant in Konsultation mit der Gruppe eine Lösung finden.

24) Als Lehrer unter der gegenwärtigen Marionettenregierung zu arbeiten, ist verboten, denn dies stärkt das System der Ungläubigen. Wahrhafte Muslime sollten sich an einen religiös ausgebildeten Lehrer wenden und in einer Moschee oder in einer ähnlichen Institution studieren. Die Lehrbücher sollten aus der Zeit des Dschihad oder des Taliban-Regimes stammen.

25) Wer als Lehrer unter der gegenwärtigen Marionettenregierung arbeitet, muss verwarnt werden. Wenn er seine Arbeit dennoch nicht aufgibt, muss er geschlagen werden. Falls der Lehrer jedoch wider die Prinzipien des Islams lehrt, muss er vom Distrikts-Kommandanten oder einem Gruppenführer getötet werden.

26) Diejenigen Nichtregierungsorganisationen (NGOs), die unter der Regierung der Ungläubigen ins Land gekommen sind, müssen gleich wie die Regierung behandelt werden. Sie kamen unter dem Vorwand, den Menschen zu helfen, sind aber in Wahrheit Teil des Regimes. Deshalb tolerieren wir keine ihre Aktivitäten, sei es der Bau von Strassen, Brücken, Kliniken, Schulen, Madrassen (Koranschulen) oder anderem. Wenn eine Schule trotz Warnung nicht schliesst, gehört sie verbrannt. Doch zuvor müssen alle religiösen Bücher in Sicherheit gebracht werden.

27) Solange jemand nicht als Spion überführt ist und bestraft werden kann, darf sich nie¬mand in die Angelegenheit einmischen. Die zuständige Person ist der Distrikts¬kommandant. Zeugen, die im Verfahren aussagen, müssen bei guter geistiger Gesundheit sein und über einen tadellosen religiösen Leumund verfügen und dürfen kein grosses Verbrechen begangen haben. Die Bestrafung darf erst nach Abschluss des Verfahrens erfolgen.

28) Kein einfacher Kommandant darf sich in Streitigkeiten der Bevölkerung einmischen. Sofern der Streit nicht gelöst werden kann, muss sich der Distrikts- oder Regional¬kommandant um die Sache kümmern. Der Fall sollte von religiösen Experten (Ulema) oder der Versammlung der Stammesältesten (Jirga) erörtert werden. Falls sie keine Lösung finden, muss der Fall an bekannte religiöse Experten weitergeleitet werden.

29) Jeder Mudschahed ist verpflichtet, Tag und Nacht Wachen zu postieren.

30) Die obigen 29 Regeln sind obligatorisch. Wer immer gegen sie verstösst, muss entsprechend den Gesetzen des Islamischen Emirates gerichtet werden.

Diese Layeha richtet sich an die Mudschaheddin, die ihr Leben für den Islam und den allmächtigen Allah opfern. Dies ist ein komplettes Regelbuch für den Fortschritt des Dschihad, und jeder Mudschahed muss die Regeln einhalten, dies ist die Pflicht eines jeden Dschihadisten und treuen Gläubigen.

Gezeichnet vom Obersten Führer des Islamischen Emirats Afghanistan

(Diese Layeha wurde erstmals an die 33 Mitglieder der Schura, des obersten Rats der Taliban, anlässlich ihres Treffens während des Ramadans 2006 verteilt, Anm. der Red.)

Tags:

Taleban Elections Government attack UN 2009 Elections

Authors: